Immigration & BorderOver Six Tons of Hidden Marijuana Found at Laredo Port of Entry, CBP Says

Customs and Border Protection reports seizing over six tons of marijuana worth more than $2.5 million at the World Trade Bridge in Laredo.
June 24, 2020
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Last week, U.S. Customs and Border Protection (CBP) announced that over $2.5 million worth of marijuana was confiscated at one of Laredo’s ports of entry after authorities found the illegal cargo inside a shipment of mattresses.

In a press release, the federal agency stated that a 2013 Freightliner was inspected using dogs and imaging equipment, and 12,738 pounds of narcotics were found.

Port Director Gregory Alvarez noted that the port, the World Trade Bridge, is becoming busier and a destination for narcotics traffickers.

“The ever-growing volume of cargo traffic processed at the port has made it a target for drug trafficking organizations, who are boldly attempting to smuggle illegal contraband through commercial consignments,” Alvarez said.

Authorities estimate the seized contraband has a street value of $2,547,635.

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CBP has referred the case to special agents with Homeland Security Investigations.

The Laredo area has been a focus of the federal government’s immigration enforcement efforts.

In May, CBP signed a $275 million contract with Caddell Construction Company to build 14 miles of border wall in Laredo.

At the time, the agency said that Laredo is a hotspot for illegal crossings and drug trafficking, with 21,000 persons taken into custody for illegal immigration and 19,000 pounds of narcotics confiscated.

In February, Defense Secretary Mark Esper approved the controversial reappropriation of $3.8 billion from Navy and Air Force programs to the construction of President Trump’s promised southern border wall.

The Homeland Security Department reports that it has constructed 216 miles of border wall to date, using 311,000 tons of steel and 458,000 cubic yards of concrete.

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Hayden Sparks

Hayden Sparks

Hayden Sparks is a reporter for The Texan in Dallas. During the academic year, he coaches high school competitive speech and debate and has also been involved in community theater and politics. A native Texan, Hayden served as a delegate at the Republican Party of Texas Convention in 2016. He is on track to receive a bachelor’s degree in psychology from Liberty University. In his free time, Hayden is known to take walks around the neighborhood while listening to random music on Spotify.

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