EducationElections 2022FederalHealthcareImmigration & BorderRepublican Monica De La Cruz Defeats Democrat Michelle Vallejo for South Texas Congressional Seat

A Republican has swept the election for a South Texas congressional district that was a long-time Democratic stronghold.
November 9, 2022
https://thetexan.news/wp-content/uploads/2022/11/Monica-de-la-Cruz-MS-1280x853.jpg
Republican Monica De La Cruz maintained a lead all evening on election night, which led her sweeping a South Texas congressional seat away from long-time Democratic control, defeating Democrat Michelle Vallejo.

De La Cruz, a small businesswoman from Edinburg, won Texas’ 15th Congressional District with 52.7 percent of the vote to Vallejo’s 45.6 percent.

The high-profile race was celebrated as a historic win by De La Cruz’s supporters at her election watch party in McAllen, as her victory makes her the first Hispanic woman to represent the district.

“I think that the message this win sends to Washington D.C. is that Hispanics believe in a strong border, they believe in legal immigration, they want a strong economy that will support small businesses and American families,” De La Cruz told The Texan in an interview shortly after her race was called.

“I think this win is not only a historic win for this district, but it sends a statement that Hispanics are no longer going to be taken for granted and that we will stand up for our values of faith, family, and freedom.”

The Texan Tumbler

De La Cruz campaigned heavily on border security, school choice, protecting the energy industry, and promoting small business, whereas her opponent, Vallejo campaigned on a progressive platform that included pro-choice policies and gun control measures.

De La Cruz slammed Democrats over multiple issues on election night. She pointed to the economy, criticized the use of the term “Latinx,” and mentioned that decades of Democratic control in South Texas have resulted in multiple counties not having one general practice physician, something she plans to get to work on when she assumes office.

“There are several counties in south Texas that do not even have one doctor and that is simply unacceptable,” De La Cruz said. “We have been under Democratic control for over one hundred years, and so that is something I have made a commitment to work on in January.”

###

Disclosure: Unlike almost every other media outlet, The Texan is not beholden to any special interests, does not apply for any type of state or federal funding, and relies exclusively on its readers for financial support. If you’d like to become one of the people we’re financially accountable to, click here to subscribe.

Get “KB's Hot Take”

A free bi-weekly commentary on current events by Konni Burton.

Matt Stringer

Matt Stringer is a reporter for The Texan who writes about all things government, politics, and public policy in West Texas. He graduated summa cum laude from Odessa College with an Associate Degree in Paralegal Studies and is presently finishing a Bachelor’s Degree in Management and Leadership. In his free time, you will find him in the great outdoors, usually in the Davis Mountains and Big Bend region of Southwest Texas.